Old Norse in the North

Yorkshire

formerly known as the County of York and “York” comes from the Viking name for the city, Jórvík

sheep-69406_640

It’s no surprise that Old Norse has influenced the English language; particularly in the North where the Vikings dominated for many years!

When I started to learn Norwegian a few years ago, I found some similarities to Yorkshire words and places and thought it would be a good idea to make a blog post out of it!

Yorkshire Definition Old Norse Bokmål
Bairn Child / Baby Barn Barn
Beck A stream / A brook Bekkr Bekk
Berserk Mad / Angry Berserkr Berserk
By Place names ending in by

eg. Grimsby

By By
Dale Valley Dalur Dal
Fell A hill / Mountain slope Fjall Fjell
Flags Flat stones used for paving, flooring or roofing Flaga Flagger
Flit To move about / move house

eg. Flit about

Flytja Å flytte
Foss Waterfall Fors Foss
Gate Street / Way

eg. Kirkgate, Briggate

Gata Gate
Gawp To stare open mouthed

eg. Stop gawping

Gapa Å gape
Laik / Leck To play

eg. Are you laiking out?

Leika Å leke
Lig / Ligg To lie down Liggja Å ligge
Lug Pull or carry, or a knot in the hair Lugge Å lugge
Mucky / Muck Dirty / Manure Myki Møkkete
Nay No Nei Nei
Reckon To think, to consider Reikna Regne med
Sillin Raining heavily

eg. It’s sillin it down

Sila Å sile
Skrike Scream loudly (related to shriek) Skrækja Å skrike
Spell Splinter of wood in the skin Spjelke Spjelke
Tarn Lake / Pond

eg. Malham Tarn

Tjarn Tjern
Thwaites eg. Linthwaite þveit Tveit

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s