Stomach Cancer Awareness Month

November is Stomach Cancer Awareness Month 💜

Did you know that there are 1,000,000 new cases of stomach cancer diagnosed globally in 2018?

Unfortunately, Stomach Cancer doesn’t get as much recognition or funding compared to other cancers… My original plan was to raise money this month by doing a sponsored hike, but those plans are on hold this year due to health reasons. Right now, I need to focus on getting better. 🍀 Instead, I will be making a donation to both #nostomachforcancer and Dr. Parry Guilford’s research. To find out more about his research and ways to donate, check out this link.

Hopefully together we can help to raise awareness, and hopefully make a difference.

💜

Pathology Results!

So today I met with my surgeon and received my results!

During my gastrectomy, they removed 27 lymph nodes from my abdomen. I’m pleased to report that all of these were clear! (Surprised at how many were removed – I’m actually curious as to how big/small they are!)

In my stomach, they found 2 foci of adenocarcinoma measuring 4mm each.

The margins were great too, meaning no gastric mucosa was left behind where they made the join.

YAY!

🎉 🎉 🎉 🎉

I was so relieved! Now I know for certain that everything was removed during the surgery, putting my mind at ease.

 

I showed him my incision, to which he confirmed was a keloid scar. 😕 If anybody out there has any suggestions/home remedies for this type of scarring, please let me know! I have ordered some silicone scar sheets and gel in hope that this will help, as I can’t even wear a bra at the moment because of it! 🙈

Anyway, the next step thanks to this lovely CDH1 mutation is annual MRI screenings for lobular breast cancer. (People with the CDH1 mutation are at an increased risk of developing gastric cancer and lobular breast cancer) This is recommended from the age of 30, but my surgeon has referred me now to get the ball rolling much sooner. 😊

 

 

One Month Update

Weight lost from the 26.09 – 26.10 = 7.7kg 

My new plumbing! Before and After

Gastrectomy-Before-and-After

Photo taken from: https://www.nostomachforcancer.org/

It’s been one month since my surgery and I’ve experienced a few hiccups along the way. I anticipated problems from my new “plumbing” but not the issues I’ve encountered…

  1. Problems with my incision
  2. Debilitating back pain

1. A few days after writing my last blog post, I ended up at the legevakt (E.R) and hospital for over 8 hours… I had been experiencing some stinging pain from my incision and couldn’t physically see what was going on since it was still covered with a steri-strip that I was told not to remove. Since it was a Sunday, we called the legevakt, and they told us to come in.

When I had my surgery, they gave me intradermal stitches and no staples – so I did not need to have anything removed. 

After a long wait, I was seen by a Doctor that examined the area. He could see that there was an opening in two different areas (at the top and above my belly button). After cleaning up the area, he called the hospital and spoke to one of the Surgeons. He wanted to see the incision, so off I went, freshly bandaged up to the hospital.

He thoroughly checked the openings and explained that they were superficial, so only the top layers were open. He explained that this was normal and often seen in young, active patients. He scrubbed the areas to make them bleed more before closing the areas with steri-strips, and was told to continue doing this over the next week if I saw any blood or leakage on the bandage. But since I’m a wimp when it comes to pain and blood, Nurse B watched the Surgeon so that he could be responsible for this task!

After being checked over by my Doctor a week later, the two areas were still slightly open but said that it was looking good and prescribed me some antibiotic cream to apply a few times a day. Luckily, this did the trick and healed the two problem areas nicely! 🙂 Hurray! I was so relieved! I was initially told that if it didn’t close up on it’s own, they would have to stitch up the two areas, which would mean cutting deeper and into the scar tissue. Ouch!

 

 

2. My other gripe has been back pain. I knew I would have some pain after surgery since I have degenerative discs in my lower spine, but this has been a nightmare. My back was bad to begin with, most likely caused by a combination of things; the epidural, lack of mobility and my back muscles overcompensating for my core. In the first few weeks, I would wake up multiple times in the middle of night with agonising pain and tense, solid back muscles. Then, after not being able to shave for a few weeks, I stupidly decided to shave my legs in the shower… What a huge mistake that was. After standing in multiple flamingo-like bent-legged poses, I had well and truly screwed up my back. Now, I can barely sit down (if I do, I can’t walk properly afterwards and I get pain radiating down my left leg) – so I’ve been spending most of my time propped up in bed or laying down.

I’m just hoping that I’m able to go and see my chiropractor soon as the problem is not resolving on it’s own.

Food-wise I’ve been trying all sorts of things! Pasta with tuna mayo, cheese on toast, jacket potato with homemade chilli, pizza… The list is endless! When my mum came to visit, we even went out for pizza on her last night, and I managed to eat half of a kids pizza! (It took me about an hour to do so, but that’s fine!)

My first outing since my surgery!

Up until the weekend, I had a great appetite and would crave almost anything. But now, even typing the above makes me nauseous. I’m not really sure what’s changed and I’m struggling to overcome it at the moment as the nausea makes it difficult for me to eat or want to eat. I’ve found that chewing peppermint gum relieves the nausea, but only temporarily. I’m just hoping I can overcome this hurdle and find some solutions to this so that I can get my appetite back. 

 

Deep throating a hose pipe…

Don’t worry, this isn’t an erotic blog post! I’m simply referring to what took place yesterday morning; my first Gastroscopy.

Since I received my genetic test results in November, I have a mutation in the CDH1 gene, which can lead to Diffuse Gastric Cancer, I have been anticipating this procedure ever since. Mainly because I just didn’t know what to expect – I knew it would take at least 30 minutes and that they would be taking 30 biopsies from my stomach, but partly because I retch when I brush my back teeth sometimes… So how was I ever going to manage swallowing a long endoscope?!

The waiting area was a long corridor lined with seats that were filled with people. Therefore, we were sat quite far away from the doorway where the Doctors came out one by one and called out a name.

When I was called out, the fact that it felt like I was walking down an awkward catwalk runway with everybody gazing at me only added to my anxiety.

After first introductions with my doctors, I preceded to tell each and every one of them that I was anxious and nervous. They all reassured me that it would be fine, that I would be sedated, and Dr. Trond told me that he was going to give me some of the “good stuff”!

After spraying some anaesthetic at the back of my throat and fitting a mouthguard, they asked me to lay on my side and administered the anaesthetic. They then placed the endoscope into my mouth and told me to swallow. (You’d think that Medical Science had advanced far enough to make an endoscope as thin as spaghetti?! Nope…)

Despite them telling me that I probably wouldn’t remember the procedure, I remember the whole thing (albeit some parts hazier than others). For the first part of the procedure, I was laid observing the whole thing on the screen as they explored the lining of my stomach and took multiple biopsies. After a while, I think the throat spray anaesthetic had worn off as I started retching repeatedly! They told me to take some deep breaths and administered more anaesthesia into my hand.

Towards the end of the procedure, I began retching again; this time more violently. I was struggling to control it and my mouth began to fill with bile and blood (gross, I know). Again, I was told to take deep breaths, but it took me a while to stop it from happening. It’s not easy with a mouthful of liquid, a mouthguard on and a tube down your throat!

After the procedure, they took me to a room to recover for an hour before discharging me. Dr. Trond came to see how I was doing and was surprised at how perky and normal I was, considering the amount of sedation I had been given (apparently it was a lot)!

gastroscopy

(Even in the hospital, I can still manage to get comfy and snug in a blanket!)

Since the gastroscopy isn’t a reliable screening method for this type of gastric cancer, I have been advised to have a total Gastrectomy in the near future. Next month I will be meeting with a surgeon here in Bergen to discuss this further so that I can make a more informed decision on what to do next. 🙂

Special shout out to B for making me lots of soup over the past two days and looking after me ❤ He’s the best